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Or follow orders and risk endangering countless lives, including those of the enemies who have somehow become his friends? In a word, yes. Kwame Alexander has the magic to pull off this unlikely feat, both as a poet and as a storyteller. Helping him along are his best friend and sometimes teammate Coby, and The Mac, a rapping librarian who gives Nick inspiring books to read.

This electric and heartfelt novel-in-verse by poet Kwame Alexander bends and breaks as it captures all the thrills and setbacks, action and emotion of a World Cup match! When his parents separate, Benny's father begins hoarding, cluttering the house, and growing more distant.

Martin Bell, a famously charming and talented physician who was shot dead as he pulled into the driveway of his Greenwich Village carriage house five years ago. She is happy to stay at home when King James of Scotland succeeds to the throne. His court may be shockingly decadent, but his intolerant Puritanism sees witchcraft in many of the old customs—punishable by death.

But when her ambitious uncle forcibly brings Frances to the royal palace, she is a ready target for the twisted scheming of the Privy Seal, Lord Cecil. But is he all that he seems? Acclaimed as a brilliant historian, Tracy Borman proves with this thrilling debut novel that she is also a born storyteller.

Even an experienced pet sitter like Daphne Templeton can be fooled by animal behavior: how can an adorably tiny fuzz ball named Tinkleston be capable of sudden flying leaps with cat claws bared? Accompanied by her unflappable basset hound, Socrates, Daphne plans to take charge of Tinks the Terror and leave the crime-solving to handsome detective Jonathan Black. But while luring the prickly Persian out of hiding, she uncovers clues that might take suspicion off her own mother. Maeve Templeton already has a reputation as a killer—in real estate.

Includes recipes for homemade pet treats! Fifty-two reflective chapters on the theme of gratitude from the author of Deep-Rooted in Christ. Into every generation a Slayer is born… Nina and her twin sister, Artemis, are far from normal. Here teens are trained as guides for Slayers—girls gifted with supernatural strength to fight the forces of darkness. Instead she follows her instincts to heal, carving out a place for herself as the school medic. One thing is clear: Being Chosen is easy. Making choices is hard. Mysteriously zapped thousands of years into the future, a teenaged Cleopatra discovers that she is destined to save the galaxy, a prophecy that compels her to enrol in a high-tech school where she can learn modern subjects, alien languages, and combat fighting.

The three of them traveled the land far and wide, but the prince didn't quite find what he was looking for in the princesses they met. While they were away, a terrible dragon threatened their land, and all the soldiers fled. The prince rushed back to save his kingdom from the perilous beast and was met by a brave knight in a suit of brightly shining armor.

Together they fought the dragon and discovered that special something the prince was looking for all along. Good food, clean clothes and the perfect environment to learn—what more could an orphan ask for? One day, though, Emma and Norman uncover the dark truth of the outside world they are forbidden from seeing. Really, you should. The Shadow of the Wind is ultimately a love letter to literature, intended for readers as passionate about storytelling as its young hero.

But this apparent triumph had an ironic twist. During the s, Eisenhower revolutionized the role of religion in American political culture, inventing new traditions from inaugural prayers to the National Prayer Breakfast. For the first time, Americans began to think of their country as an officially Christian nation. Provocative and authoritative, One Nation Under God reveals how the unholy alliance of money, religion, and politics created a false origin story that continues to define and divide American politics to this day.

The epic history of how antibiotics were born, saving millions of lives and creating a vast new industry known as Big Pharma. As late as the s, virtually no drug intended for sickness did any good; doctors could set bones, deliver babies, and offer palliative care. That all changed in less than a generation with the discovery and development of a new category of medicine known as antibiotics.

By , the age-old evolutionary relationship between humans and microbes had been transformed, trivializing once-deadly infections. William Rosen captures this revolution with all its false starts, lucky surprises, and eccentric characters. He explains why, given the complex nature of bacteria—and their ability to rapidly evolve into new forms—the only way to locate and test potential antibiotic strains is by large-scale, systematic, trial-and-error experimentation. Organizing that research needs large, well-funded organizations and businesses, and so our entire scientific-industrial complex, built around the pharmaceutical company, was born.

In January , as World War I raged on, a new and terrifying virus began to spread across the globe. In three successive waves, from to , influenza killed more than 50 million people. Nowhere on earth escaped: the United States recorded , deaths five times its total military fatalities in the war while European deaths totaled over two million. Amid the war, some governments suppressed news of the outbreak. Meanwhile, civilian families were being struck down in their homes. The City of Philadelphia ran out of gravediggers and coffins, and mass burial trenches had to be excavated with steam shovels.

Spanish flu conjured up the specter of the Black Death of and the great plague of , while the medical profession, shattered after five terrible years of conflict, lacked the resources to contain and defeat this new enemy. Through primary and archival sources, historian Catharine Arnold gives readers the first truly global account of the terrible epidemic. The world as we know it is ending. Evolution has reversed itself, affecting every living creature on earth. Science cannot stop the world from running backwards, as woman after woman gives birth to infants that appear to be primitive species of humans.

Twenty-six-year-old Cedar Hawk Songmaker, adopted daughter of a pair of big-hearted, open-minded Minneapolis liberals, is as disturbed and uncertain as the rest of America around her. But for Cedar, this change is profound and deeply personal. She is four months pregnant. As Cedar goes back to her own biological beginnings, society around her begins to disintegrate, fueled by a swelling panic about the end of humanity.

There are rumors of martial law, of Congress confining pregnant women. Of a registry, and rewards for those who turn these wanted women in. Flickering through the chaos are signs of increasing repression: a shaken Cedar witnesses a family wrenched apart when police violently drag a mother from her husband and child in a parking lot. The streets of her neighborhood have been renamed with Bible verses. A stranger answers the phone when she calls her adoptive parents, who have vanished without a trace. It will take all Cedar has to avoid the prying eyes of potential informants and keep her baby safe.

A chilling dystopian novel both provocative and prescient, Future Home of the Living God is a startlingly original work from one of our most acclaimed writers: a moving meditation on female agency, self-determination, biology, and natural rights that speaks to the troubling changes of our time. Izzy Spellman launches her career as a private investigator while working for the firm of her outlandishly dysfunctional family.

An instant New York Times and indie bestseller, Dopesick is the only book to fully chart the devastating opioid crisis in America: "a harrowing, deeply compassionate dispatch from the heart of a national emergency" New York Times from a bestselling author and journalist who has lived through it In this masterful work, Beth Macy takes us into the epicenter of America's twenty-plus year struggle with opioid addiction.

From distressed small communities in Central Appalachia to wealthy suburbs; from disparate cities to once-idyllic farm towns; it's a heartbreaking trajectory that illustrates how this national crisis has persisted for so long and become so firmly entrenched. Beginning with a single dealer who lands in a small Virginia town and sets about turning high school football stars into heroin overdose statistics, Macy endeavors to answer a grieving mother's question-why her only son died-and comes away with a harrowing story of greed and need.

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From the introduction of OxyContin in , Macy parses how America embraced a medical culture where overtreatment with painkillers became the norm. In some of the same distressed communities featured in her bestselling book Factory Man, the unemployed use painkillers both to numb the pain of joblessness and pay their bills, while privileged teens trade pills in cul-de-sacs, and even high school standouts fall prey to prostitution, jail, and death. Through unsparing, yet deeply human portraits of the families and first responders struggling to ameliorate this epidemic, each facet of the crisis comes into focus.

In these politically fragmented times, Beth Macy shows, astonishingly, that the only thing that unites Americans across geographic and class lines is opioid drug abuse. But in a country unable to provide basic healthcare for all, Macy still finds reason to hope-and signs of the spirit and tenacity necessary in those facing addiction to build a better future for themselves and their families. Collects autobiographical, illustrated essays and cartoons from the author's popular blog and related new material that humorously and candidly deals with her own idiosyncrasies and battles with depression.

At the end of her rope, Codi Noline returns to her Arizona home to face her ailing father, with whom she has a difficult, distant relationship. This edition includes a P. For fans of Marie Lu comes the first book in an epic series that bends the sci-fi genre into a new dimension. This afternoon, her planet was invaded. Now with enemy fire raining down on them, Kady and Ezra—who are barely even talking to each other—are forced to evacuate with a hostile warship in hot pursuit.

But their problems are just getting started. Told through a fascinating dossier of hacked documents—including emails, maps, files, IMs, medical reports, interviews, and more—Illuminae is the first book in a heart-stopping trilogy about lives interrupted, the price of truth, and the courage of everyday heroes. A fantastically fun ride. You're about to be immersed in a mindscape that you'll never want to leave. Novel: Unforgettable. Smart, funny, and romantic. Presents the parallel stories of a young woman who falls in love with an Armenian soldier while aiding victims of the Armenian genocide in the early twentieth century, and a young woman who researches her Armenian heritage and discovers a terrible familysecret.

When her university professor father is sent by the Gestapo to a concentration camp, seven-year-old Anna travels the Polish countryside with the mysterious Swallow Man during World War II. Meredith May recalls the first time a honeybee crawled on her arm. She was five years old, her parents had recently split and suddenly she found herself in the care of her grandfather, an eccentric beekeeper who made honey in a rusty old military bus in the yard.

That first close encounter was at once terrifying and exhilarating for May, and in that moment she discovered that everything she needed to know about life and family was right before her eyes, in the secret world of bees. May turned to her grandfather and the art of beekeeping as an escape from her troubled reality. Her mother had receded into a volatile cycle of neurosis and despair and spent most days locked away in the bedroom. Part memoir, part beekeeping odyssey, The Honey Bus is an unforgettable story about finding home in the most unusual of places, and how a tiny, little-understood insect could save a life.

I found it so transporting that 48 hours after completing it, I was still resentful to be back home. Perry writes beautifully and sometimes agreeably sharply The Essex Serpent is a wonderfully satisfying novel. Ford Madox Ford thought the glory of the novel was its ability to make the reader think and feel at the same time.

This one does just that. Wed at nineteen, this woman of exceptional intelligence and curiosity was ill-suited for the role of society wife. While admiring the sites, Cora learns of an intriguing rumor that has arisen further up the estuary, of a fearsome creature said to roam the marshes claiming human lives.

A keen amateur naturalist with no patience for religion or superstition, Cora is immediately enthralled, and certain that what the local people think is a magical sea beast may be a previously undiscovered species. Eager to investigate, she is introduced to local vicar William Ransome. Will, too, is suspicious of the rumors. But unlike Cora, this man of faith is convinced the rumors are caused by moral panic, a flight from true belief. These seeming opposites who agree on nothing soon find themselves inexorably drawn together and torn apart—an intense relationship that will change both of their lives in ways entirely unexpected.

Hailed by Sarah Waters as "a work of great intelligence and charm, by a hugely talented author," The Essex Serpent is "irresistible. In these stories Adichie turns her penetrating eye to the ties that bind men and women, parents and children, Nigeria and the United States. From the Hardcover edition. When Auden goes to stay with her father, stepmother, and new baby sister the summer before she starts college, all the trauma of her parents' divorce is revived, even as she is making new friends and having fun new experiences.

Louis, Maya is attacked by a man many times her age—and has to live with the consequences for a lifetime. Poetic and powerful, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is a modern American classic that will touch hearts and change minds for as long as people read. From the Paperback edition. In her award-winning book The Woman Warrior, Maxine Hong Kingston created an entirely new form—an exhilarating blend of autobiography and mythology, of world and self, of hot rage and cool analysis. First published in , it has become a classic in its innovative portrayal of multiple and intersecting identities—immigrant, female, Chinese, American.

Two children of the Glass family appear in separate stories set in twentieth-century New York. Why is this important? Because we will become what we believe. Our beliefs will prove either a barrier or vehicle as we strive to go higher, rise above our obstacles, and to live in health, abundance, and victory. And I will be tomorrow what I'm believing about myself right now. God sees us as more than conquerors, able to fulfill our destiny.

We need to see ourselves through the eyes of our Creator. And he encourages readers to be people of faith, for if you can see the invisible, God will do the impossible. From the acclaimed author of The Assistants comes another gutsy book about the importance of women taking the reins--this time, when it comes to love, sex, and self-acceptance.

At first neither of them knows what to make of the other, but soon their undeniable connection will bring into question everything each of them thought they knew about sex and love. When Katie Met Cassidy is a romantic comedy about gender and sexuality, and the importance of figuring out who we are in order to go after what we truly want.

It's also a portrait of a high-drama subculture where barrooms may as well be bedrooms, and loyal friends fill in the spaces absent families leave behind. Katie's glimpse into this wild yet fiercely tightknit community begins to alter not only how she sees the larger world, but also where exactly she fits in. In this tale, first published serially in and , Dickens follows Nell Trent, an angelic and unfailingly virtuous girl of "nearly fourteen" and her grandfather as they navigate a world populated by villains, criminals and ne'er-do-wells.

The public response at the time equalled modern reactions to the Harry Potter books, the audience rapt to learn of Nell's fate. Does she live a life of comfort, of which her grandfather dreams? Or does fate have something less noble in store for poor Nell? This is a free digital copy of a book that has been carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online.

To make this print edition available as an ebook, we have extracted the text using Optical Character Recognition OCR technology and submitted it to a review process to ensure its accuracy and legibility across different screen sizes and devices. Google is proud to partner with libraries to make this book available to readers everywhere. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm.

By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who? Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning New Yorker reporter and New York Times bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a mesmerizing and uniquely compelling book that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.

In The Library Book, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries across the country and around the world, from their humble beginnings as a metropolitan charitable initiative to their current status as a cornerstone of national identity; brings each department of the library to vivid life through on-the-ground reporting; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; reflects on her own experiences in libraries; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago.

Along the way, Orlean introduces us to an unforgettable cast of characters from libraries past and present—from Mary Foy, who in at eighteen years old was named the head of the Los Angeles Public Library at a time when men still dominated the role, to Dr. The best-selling coming-of-age classic, acclaimed by critics, beloved by readers of all ages, taught in schools and universities alike, and translated around the world. The House on Mango Street is the remarkable story of Esperanza Cordero, a young Latina girl growing up in Chicago, inventing for herself who and what she will become.

Few other books in our time have touched so many readers. National Book Award finalist Sy Montgomery reflects on the personalities and quirks of 13 animals—her friends—who have profoundly affected her in this stunning, poetic, and life-affirming memoir featuring illustrations by Rebecca Green. Understanding someone who belongs to another species can be transformative. No one knows this better than author, naturalist, and adventurer Sy Montgomery. It also explores vast themes: the otherness and sameness of people and animals; the various ways we learn to love and become empathetic; how we find our passion; how we create our families; coping with loss and despair; gratitude; forgiveness; and most of all, how to be a good creature in the world.

Dark Horse presents new editions of the entire Hellboy line with new covers, beginning with Seed of Destruction, the basis of director Guillermo del Toro's blockbuster films. Hellboy is one of the most celebrated comics series in recent years. The ultimate artists' artist and a great storyteller whose work is in turns haunting, hilarious, and spellbinding.

Mike Mignola has won numerous awards in the comics industry and beyond. When strangeness threatens to engulf the world, a strange man will come to save it. Sent to investigate a mystery with supernatural overtones, Hellboy discovers the secrets of his own origins, and his link to the Nazi occultists who promised Hitler a final solution in the form of a demonic avatar.

Hellboy is a brilliant example of how to elevate the comic of the future to a higher literary level while achieving a higher pitch of excitement. But at night he patrols the streets of Seattle, where he champions the oppressed as a true social justice warrior. He is Green Arrow. But how can you fight the man when you are the man? Without fortune or friends, can Green Arrow defeat this unholy alliance of traitors?

Or has death finally caught up with Oliver Queen? The 1 New York Times bestseller. Ulysses S.

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Grant's life has typically been misunderstood. All too often he is caricatured as a chronic loser and an inept businessman, or as the triumphant but brutal Union general of the Civil War. But these stereotypes don't come close to capturing him, as Chernow shows in his masterful biography, the first to provide a complete understanding of the general and president whose fortunes rose and fell with dizzying speed and frequency. Before the Civil War, Grant was flailing. His business ventures had ended dismally, and despite distinguished service in the Mexican War he ended up resigning from the army in disgrace amid recurring accusations of drunkenness.

But in war, Grant began to realize his remarkable potential, soaring through the ranks of the Union army, prevailing at the battle of Shiloh and in the Vicksburg campaign, and ultimately defeating the legendary Confederate general Robert E. Along the way, Grant endeared himself to President Lincoln and became his most trusted general and the strategic genius of the war effort.

This is America's greatest biographer, bringing movingly to life one of our finest but most underappreciated presidents. The definitive biography, Grant is a grand synthesis of painstaking research and literary brilliance that makes sense of all sides of Grant's life, explaining how this simple Midwesterner could at once be so ordinary and so extraordinary. Li Lan, the daughter of a respectable Chinese family in colonial Malaysia, hopes for a favorable marriage, but her father has lost his fortune, and she has few suitors. Rarely practiced, a traditional ghost marriage is used to placate a restless spirit.

Such a union would guarantee Li Lan a home for the rest of her days, but at what price? Woodward draws from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, meeting notes, personal diaries, files and documents. With a passion that sometimes became obsessive, he pursued innovative studies of anatomy, fossils, birds, the heart, flying machines, botany, geology, and weaponry. He explored the math of optics, showed how light rays strike the cornea, and produced illusions of changing perspectives in The Last Supper. So, too, does his ease at being a bit of a misfit: illegitimate, gay, vegetarian, left-handed, easily distracted, and at times heretical.

His life should remind us of the importance to be imaginative and, like talented rebels in any era, to think different. The first biography of America's greatest twentieth-century sculptor, Alexander Calder: an authoritative and revelatory achievement, based on a wealth of letters and papers never before available, and written by one of our most renowned art critics. Alexander Calder is one of the most beloved and widely admired artists of the twentieth century.

Anybody who has ever set foot in a museum knows him as the inventor of the mobile, America's unique contribution to modern art. But only now, forty years after the artist's death, is the full story of his life being told in this biography, which is based on unprecedented access to Calder's letters and papers as well as scores of interviews. Jed Perl shows us why Calder was--and remains--a barrier breaker, an avant-garde artist with mass appeal. This beautifully written, deeply researched book opens with Calder's wonderfully peripatetic upbringing in Philadelphia, California, and New York.

We move through Calder's early years studying engineering to his first artistic triumphs in Paris in the late s, and to his emergence as a leader in the international abstract avant-garde. His marriage in to the free-spirited Louisa James--she was a great-niece of Henry James--is a richly romantic story, related here with a wealth of detail and nuance. Calder's life takes on a transatlantic richness, from New York's Greenwich Village in the Roaring Twenties, to the Left Bank of Paris during the Depression, and then back to the United States, where the Calders bought a run-down old farmhouse in western Connecticut.

New light is shed on Calder's lifelong interest in dance, theater, and performance, ranging from the Cirque Calder, the theatrical event that became his calling card in bohemian Paris to collaborations with the choreographer Martha Graham and the composer Virgil Thomson. More than illustrations in color and black-and-white--including little-known works and many archival photographs that have never before been seen--further enrich the story.

What secret connection do both Batman and The Joker share with a strange and mysterious young girl? After she's kidnapped by The Joker, Batman must plunge deep into the underworld of Gotham City and race against time to find out where she's being held. The stakes are high, and for Batman, it's personal! Beautifully painted in Marini's unmistakable style, this tale portrays the Dark Knight, his greatest foes and Gotham City itself in a radical reimagination of the mythology. Celebrated throughout Europe for his incredible graphic works, this landmark hardcover brings one of the great Italian illustrators to DC!

Baking with Mary Berry draws on Mary's more than 60 years in the kitchen, with tips and step-by-step instructions for bakers just starting out and full-color photographs of finished dishes throughout. The stage crew at St. Genesius Prep—or Backstagers, as they like to call themselves—are ready for whatever the theater world can throw their way: the madness of tech week, inevitable prop malfunctions, and all the paranormal activity that goes on behind the scenes.

But lately, someone—or something—seems set on ruining their production of Phantasm. It all started when an actor brought a Spirit Board to the cast party, and the ghost light blew out. Every good theater kid knows that a ghost light must be left on to keep ghosts from moving in the shadows of an empty theater. Small-town librarian Lindsey Norris must solve a murder and a missing person's case involving two reclusive brothers. She enjoys visiting them in their treasure-filled, ramshackle Victorian on Star Island until she discovers that Peter has been killed and Stewart is missing.

Now she's determined to solve a murder and find Stewart before he suffers his brother's fate. A Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller A deeply moving, gorgeously illustrated short story for people of all ages from the international bestselling author of The Kite Runner, brought to life by Dan Williams's beautiful illustrations 'The book may be brief, but it is beautiful, poetic — a distillation of his strengths' Sunday Times On a moonlit beach a father cradles his sleeping son as they wait for dawn to break and a boat to arrive.

He speaks to his boy of the long summers of his childhood, recalling his grandfather's house in Syria, the stirring of olive trees in the breeze, the bleating of his grandmother's goat, the clanking of her cooking pots. And he remembers, too, the bustling city of Homs with its crowded lanes, its mosque and grand souk, in the days before the sky spat bombs and they had to flee.

When the sun rises they and those around them will gather their possessions and embark on a perilous sea journey in search of a new home. As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers.

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Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world.

For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return. The Bee Book shows you step-by-step how to create a bee-friendly garden, get started in beekeeping, and harness the power of honey for well-being. Fully illustrated with full-color photographs throughout, this beautiful guide covers everything you need to know to start your own backyard hive, from setup to harvest. Practical beekeeping techniques are explained with clear step-by-step sequences, photos, and diagrams so you'll be prepared to establish your own colony, deal with diseases, collect a swarm, and much more.

A comprehensive gardening chapter features planting plans to fill container and border gardens, bee "hotel" and habitat projects, and an at-a-glance flower gallery of bees' favorite plants. The Bee Book also shows you how to harvest honey, beeswax, and propolis from the hive and use these ingredients in 38 recipes for home remedies, beauty treatments, and candle-making. Discover the wonder of bees in nature, in your garden, and in the hive with The Bee Book.

An expert in the chemical nature of poisons, she has solved many mysteries, sharpening her considerable detection skills to the point where she had little choice but to turn professional. So Flavia and dependable Dogger, estate gardener and sounding board extraordinaire, set up shop at the once-grand mansion of Buckshaw, eager to serve—not so simple an endeavor with her odious little moon-faced cousin, Undine, constantly underfoot.

But Flavia and Dogger persevere. Robert F.

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One of the first naturalists to observe live insects directly, Maria Sibylla Merian was also one of the first to document the metamorphosis of the butterfly. In this visual nonfiction biography, richly illustrated throughout with full-color original paintings by Merian herself, the Newbery Honor—winning author Joyce Sidman paints her own picture of one of the first female entomologists and a woman who flouted convention in the pursuit of knowledge and her passion for insects.

Can't keep a houseplant alive, no matter how hard you try and how good your intentions are? This is the book for you. You need this book. Give plants a chance. Help your plant live with survival tips and learn the simple ways not to kill your plants. With over 50 different types of popular houseplants, How Not to Kill Your Houseplant summarizes what type of care your plants do or don't need. Be on the lookout for warning signs of a sick plant, from brown spots to crispy leaves, and make sure you take the proper action to rescue your plant. Learn the basics of horticulture, from watering your plant to what kind of soil it should be placed in to how much light it needs every day to if a certain type of plant will thrive in your living space.

Find out how to keep a cactus alive, where to hang air plants, and how to repot succulents. Full of helpful tips, pictures, and informational panels, How Not to Kill Your Houseplant will turn your home into a beautiful greenhouse of healthy, happy plants. Stella Lane thinks math is the only thing that unites the universe. She comes up with algorithms to predict customer purchases--a job that has given her more money than she knows what to do with, and way less experience in the dating department than the average thirty-year-old. It doesn't help that Stella has Asperger's and French kissing reminds her of a shark getting its teeth cleaned by pilot fish.

Her conclusion: she needs lots of practice--with a professional. Which is why she hires escort Michael Phan. The Vietnamese and Swedish stunner can't afford to turn down Stella's offer, and agrees to help her check off all the boxes on her lesson plan--from foreplay to more-than-missionary position Before long, Stella not only learns to appreciate his kisses, but crave all of the other things he's making her feel. Their no-nonsense partnership starts making a strange kind of sense.

And the pattern that emerges will convince Stella that love is the best kind of logic Anne Corey is about to get schooled. Anne should be able to keep herself distracted. As the school year advances and her long-buried feelings begin to resurface, Anne begins to wonder whether she just might get a second chance at love.

In a high-suspense race against time, three of the most unlikely heroes Stephen King has ever created try to stop a lone killer from blowing up thousands. The stolen Mercedes emerges from the pre-dawn fog and plows through a crowd of men and women on line for a job fair in a distressed American city. Then the lone driver backs up, charges again, and speeds off, leaving eight dead and more wounded.

Crunch is a lovely and quiet brontosaurus who has hidden himself in some shubbery and is rather shy. He would like to play, but it will require some gentle coaxing from you! If you are patient and encouraging, you will find yourself with a new friend! This picture book is a warm, funny example of how to engage with someone new, who is perhaps a bit different from you. Lessons in friend-making such as minding personal space and demonstrating interest in another's hobbies are delivered so subtly that children will absorb them unconsciously as they delight in Crunch's silly hat and dance moves!

In this gripping page-turner, an ex-agent on the run from her former employers must take one more case to clear her name and save her life. She used to work for the U. An expert in her field, she was one of the darkest secrets of an agency so clandestine it doesn't even have a name. And when they decided she was a liability, they came for her without warning. Now she rarely stays in the same place or uses the same name for long. They've killed the only other person she trusted, but something she knows still poses a threat.

They want her dead, and soon. When her former handler offers her a way out, she realizes it's her only chance to erase the giant target on her back. But it means taking one last job for her ex-employers. To her horror, the information she acquires only makes her situation more dangerous.

Resolving to meet the threat head-on, she prepares for the toughest fight of her life but finds herself falling for a man who can only complicate her likelihood of survival. As she sees her choices being rapidly whittled down, she must apply her unique talents in ways she never dreamed of. He has won many awards and Less has won him the Pulitzer prize for fiction in This makes total sense.

Greer is a great writer, one who clearly excels at any subject which he puts his mind to. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo was one of those books which was recommended by everyone. Eventually, I gave in and picked up a copy at my local charity shop. The first two chapters from what I can remember — it was a few years ago now were a bit of a hard slog, Larsson was most certainly one for detail and he clearly did an awful lot of research for each of his novels. I did actually learn from these two chapters, but the subject was mainly the financial market of Sweden and how technology companies made their money, so really a bit dry.

I fell in love with the characters and willed them to find their happy ending, or perhaps just some closure and peace after so many years of mystery and loss. This trilogy is not for the faint-hearted. There are several very graphic scenes depicted within its pages. I have to admit, when I found out it was going to be made into a film, I was pleased, but also a little apprehensive over how the director would deal with this level of graphic physical and sexual violence whilst still keeping the integrity of the story.

I was, thankfully, pleasantly surprised. It was a relief to see that Larsson really was a master storyteller and was able to push his characters into new plots and new conspiracies with ease. Check out the comic book version, available at Forbidden Planet. One of the things which makes his stories so believable is the vast cast of characters who appear. Often in novels, the author will only write about and focus on characters with whom the main protagonist will come into contact.

Larsson, however, knows that there are more than just the main characters in play in each of the scenarios and predicaments his characters get themselves into, he sees the far-reaching effects of the, often rash behaviour of his main characters, and he shows it to us. His ensemble cast is massive. For any of you who have read or even seen Game of Thrones, well he could easily have rivalled George R R Martin if he focussed on more than one the lands of Westeros and their ruling families. When I first started reading this series of books, I got a little annoyed at his jumping between, seemingly unimportant, characters.

It is this aspect which makes his often far-fetched stories come to life, seeing the scenarios from different characters, including the villains, makes each event a lot more tangible and real. Steig Larsson died prior to the publication of the Millenium series and it with this knowledge that I read them, knowing that the third book would be the last.

It was well recorded that Lagaercrantz had a bit of an issue with the way in which women would throw themselves at Bloomkvist without a seconds thought. He, therefore, tries to make Bloomkvist work a bit more for female attention. Instead, adding to the depth and personal history of several of the characters, filling them out to make them more than merely two-dimensional characters on the periphery of Millenium and the authorities investigations, and instead making them fully fledged characters in their own right.

There are some interesting themes explored in this book; religion, honour and family play a pivotal role in the story and its twists and turns. Lisbeth and her moral beliefs and complexities get her into all sorts of trouble, whilst dealing with her own demons, both real and imagined. Forty years ago, Harriet Vanger disappeared from a family gathering on the island owned and inhabited by the powerful Vanger clan. Her body was never found, yet her uncle is convinced it was murder — and that the killer is a member of his own tightly knit but dysfunctional family.

He employs disgraced financial journalist Mikael Blomkvist and the tattooed, truculent computer hacker Lisbeth Salander to investigate. But the Vangers are a secretive clan, and Blomkvist and Salander are about to find out just how far they are prepared to go to protect themselves. Lisbeth Salander is a wanted woman. Her history of unpredictable and vengeful behaviour makes her an official danger to society — but no-one can find her.

Yet Salander is more avenging angel than helpless victim. She may be an expert at staying out of sight — but she has ways of tracking down her most elusive enemies. Salander is plotting her revenge — against the man who tried to kill her, and against the government institutions that very nearly destroyed her life.

But it is not going to be a straightforward campaign. After taking a bullet to the head, Salander is under close supervision in Intensive Care, and is set to face trial for three murders and one attempted murder on her eventual release. Once a victim herself, Salander is now ready to fight back. The sequel to The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series has been shrouded in such secrecy that the novel was written on computers with no internet connection to avoid any leaks.

Based on a plot outline Stieg Larsson wrote before his death, the novel was completed by David Lagercrantz and is finally here. The uncompromising anti-hero Lisbeth Salander is again the chief protagonist, along with campaigning journalist Mikael Blomkvist, a lone wolf and champion of the truth. When a superhacker has gained access to top secret U. Then Blomkvist is contacted by renowned Swedish scientist Professor Balder. It seems that Salander, like Balder, is a target of ruthless cyber gangsters — and a violent criminal conspiracy that will very soon bring terror to the snowbound streets of Stockholm, to the Millennium team, and to Blomkvist and Salander themselves.

Lisbeth Salander, the girl with the dragon tattoo, the brilliant hacker, the obstinate outsider, the volatile seeker of justice for herself and others—even she has never been able to uncover the most telling facts of her traumatic childhood, the secrets that might finally, fully explain her to herself.

Now, when she sees a chance to uncover them once and for all, she enlists the help of Mikael Blomkvist, the editor of the muckraking, investigative journal Millennium.

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And she will let nothing stop her—not the Islamists she enrages by rescuing a young woman from their brutality; not the prison gang leader who passes a death sentence on her; not the deadly reach of her long-lost twin sister, Camilla; and not the people who will do anything to keep buried knowledge of a sinister pseudoscientific experiment known only as The Registry.

Once again, Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist, together, are the fierce heart of a thrilling full-tilt novel that takes on some of the most insidious problems facing the world at this very moment. I loved this book, I also quite enjoyed the film. There was something not quite right about the main character and everything that happened to her. You willed her to be more than she appeared. You felt sorry for her, but at the same time, you could definitely see yourself making the same mistakes.

Rachel is a flawed individual, an alcoholic, at times a horrible person, but someone who you are rooting for. Hawkins manages to make her all of those things within the first couple of chapters and untangles her twisted tale throughout the rest of the book. It truly was a page-turner. You know the feeling when you question how humanity can be so cruel and evil? That is how I feel about this book. Who killed Nel? Did she jump? Was she pushed? Now Nel is dead. They say she jumped. But Jules is afraid.


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Of her long-buried memories, of the old Mill House, of this small town that is drowining in secrecy…. The book focusses on the relationships between several central characters. I have an almost morbid fascination with stories which focus on dysfunctional family relationships, I think that they make me feel better about my own. It can be cathartic, whilst also being incredibly uncomfortable, to relate to these characters so deeply.

Another main theme appears to be the relationship between parent and child. At the heart of this book is not the river, as first believed, but the interactions and often disastrous encounters which the characters have with one another. Once you look below the ordinary exterior of the people in Beckford you discover the dark secrets and turmoil hiding just below the surface.

Into the Water is set in a small town called Beckford. It is basically a blog which focusses on the settings of books. There is even a section in which authors will discuss their works in relation to the settings. This is a very well written book and a story that keeps you hooked from beginning to end. Well worth a read, but only if you are in the right emotional state. I found this book on offer at my local supermarket. This book struck me as a bit strange and unusual within ten pages.

Anthony Horowitz has broken the fourth wall of writing. This in itself is not unusual. It has been done in many novels over the years. What is unusual is that he had made himself a character. And the information he provides about himself is pretty accurate. It makes me wonder how much of the rest of the story is based on real people and real events. This is, after all, a murder mystery. It is not as if he is using his voice as a character, he himself is the character, with a real life and a real family and his achievements are real and accurate, his career is real, even his script for Tintin being scrapped is real although, who knows if it went down the way the describes in the book.

As I read through the book, I realised that there is a lot of factual information about who Horowitz has worked with and what he has worked on. So much so that at times I feel his main characters in the murder mystery are in fact real people. Changing perhaps only the spelling of his name and his, of course, his surname. Having now finished the book, I am more and more inclined to believe that this murder actually happened. Both Hawthorne and Anthony are of course real people, the places they visit are most certainly real, and it leads me to believe that many of the events are also.

The title of the novel appears on page 25, during a conversation between Horowitz and Hawthorne, he then also makes reference to this at the end of the book. I found this running commentary to the story to be very useful but at times a little off-putting. It is a good story, told well, but I think I found it hard to get over the main device.

The other main character, Hawthorne, reminded me, in a lot of ways, of Sherlock Holmes. The more I read about Horowitz and his career both on and off the screen, the more I realise that he was an ideal choice for such an endeavour. The story itself is a pretty good one, a murder mystery at heart and one which compels you to read on and learn more. A very private detective uncovering secrets but hiding his own. What do they have in common? Spread the word, The Word is Murder! Although, it now gives me pause on the idea of pre-arranged funerals. The story actually turns out to be quite emotional with plot twists galore, most of which I, the reader, did not see coming.

I also found the writing to be easy to follow and fast paced, perhaps this is down to his career in young adult fiction. I did actually find myself steaming through the pages of this book. Reading this book was actually quite pleasurable if at times a little off-putting when Horowitz himself interjects his thoughts and feelings.

Definitely worth a read though. Thoughts about the blurb Personally, I think that this blurb gives too much away. He carried on, believing that he and Antonio were in a stable relationship, although Jack and Ruth discovered that he was in fact deluding himself.

ШЕРЛОК ХОЛМС И ДОКТОР ВАТСОН (советский сериал все серии подряд)

Some time later, when he was finally confronted by this fact, Jack, Ruth and Braxiatel were stunned to discover Antonio was real, in a fashion. He told Benny how he met Antonio on Bastion. In fact, Antonio was Peter's "mother", Avril Fenman , who was possessing the crystal moon that orbited Legion and had turned him against Bernice. Avril had returned to reclaim her son, although Peter eventually turned against her and killed Avril and Antonio. He became distraught once this happened and fell into his mother's arms. The two of them buried Antonio together.

He went on a security mission to Morros Prime.

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He was asked to lead the security on one of Willem van der Heever 's masquerades. He noticed that his mother rarely unpacks. He told Benny about the security system. He had to investigate a dead body in a swimming pool. He noticed a video of Willem's wife, Nexo and wanted to stop an attempted murder. His half Killoran DNA made him last longer than the other guests in the gas attack, but he eventually succumbed. After this Benny forgot about him. He was removed from time by the Epoch and brainwashed to think he was an actor, called Thomas Grant, playing himself and a character called Finn who didn't know his parents.

Benny managed to undo this brainwashing in order to defeat them. He then used the Epochs technology to find his long lost love, Antonio. Peter found that Antonio was dead. He later met someone in a club on Bacchus Five. The relationship didn't last when Peter heard him mocking his Killoran-human physiology. Shortly after this he joined his mother when she investigated the Glamour, a device belonging to the Ancients of the Universe. Peter joined Benny on an expedition to her past.

The time machine which they had taken from the Braxitel collection exploded and caused Peter to age. Benny hoped that returning to their time would undo this. He later got married , settling down for a new life. A human - Killoran hybrid , Peter looked like a blend of his parents' two species. Like his Killoran father, he had fur, but much softer and finer. His physical strength, while perhaps not as great as a typical Killoran's, was still so great that he was stronger than all but the strongest humans by late childhood.

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